Chorioretinitis in Cats

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Inflammation of the Choroid and Retina in the Eye of the Cat

Chorioretinitis is a medical condition which affects the eyes of cats. The term refers to inflammation of the choroid and retina, a layered membrane that lines the inner eyeball and which contains the light-sensitive rods, cones, and cells that convert images into signals and send messages to the brain to allow for vision. The choroid is located immediately under the retina and is part of the middle layer of the eyeball that contains the blood vessels. The choroid is also called the posterior uvea, which is the entire middle layer of the eyeball that contains the blood vessels.

Spreading inflammation may result in separation of the back part of the eye (retina) from the underlying, vascular part of the eyeball (choroid); a condition known as retinal detachment. Chorioretinitis may be a sign of a generalized (systemic) disease. Therefore, appropriate diagnostic testing is important. Secondary glaucoma, in which the pressure within the eye is increased secondary to inflammation in the eye, can also be a complication related to inflammation, and will also require treatment.

Chorioretinitis can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this condition affects dogs, please visit this page in the petMD health library.

Symptoms and Types

Chorioretinitis is not usually painful except when the front part of the eye, including the iris, is affected. Some of the symptoms that may point to chorioretinitis include vitreous abnormalities, which can display as tearing, bleeding, or will show evidence of the vitreous becoming liquefied (the vitreous is the clear, gel-like material that fills the back part of the eyeball between the lens and the retina). A condition sometimes seen in cats is invasion of the eye by fly larvae. Tracts from migrating larvae may be seen when the eye is examined with an ophthalmoscope.

Changes in the appearance of the retina when examined with an ophthalmoscope may include change in color, darkened or lighter areas, scars, and changes in the contour/surface of the retina. A close examination may show few, or small, lesions.

Causes

As you can see in the list below, the conditions that can lead to chorioretinitis are varied. Your veterinarian will need to consider biological, chemical, and genetic causes, just to name a few. There is also the possibility that a cause for the condition will not be found, in which case it will be classified as idiopathic (of unknown origin) in nature.

  • Parasites
  • Fungal infections
  • Bacterial infection (e.g., Bartonella)
  • Viral infections (e.g., feline leukemia, feline AIDS, feline infectious peritonitis)
  • Protozoal infection
  • Autoimmune disease
  • Genetic predisposition
  • Metabolic
  • Cancer
  • Generalized infection, such as blood poisoning or bacteria in the blood
  • Toxicity (e.g., antifreeze poisoning, or adverse reaction to medications)
  • Physical trauma

Diagnosis

Your veterinarian will use diagnostic tools that are both invasive and non-invasive in order to make a correct diagnosis of chorioretinitis. The non-invasive methods will include measuring your pet's blood pressure; screening a large area of the retina with indirect ophthalmoscopy (an instrument used for viewing the interior structure of the eye by use of a light reflecting mirror), or using direct ophthalmoscopy for closer examination of the affected areas of the eye. If results are not conclusive at that point, the need for invasive procedures will become a factor in pinpointing the cause for the chorioretinitis.

Your veterinarian may be able to make a diagnosis by examining a fluid specimen from the eye, which will be a fairly simple procedure, or there may be a need for a deeper examination, in which case your doctor will want to take a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (also called spinal fluid, the liquid that bathes the brain and spine) to look for infection, or for an indication of central nervous system disease or optic neuritis. Cerebrospinal fluid is removed through a procedure called a spinal tap, where a needle is inserted into the vertebrae of the spine and the fluid is allowed to collect into a vial. The sample is then sent to a lab for testing. It is a fairly quick procedure, but your pet would have to be sedated and might be affected for the rest of the day afterward.

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prognosis

The prediction of a disease’s outcome in advance

peritonitis

A medical condition in which the peritoneum becomes inflamed

retina

The layer of the eye that is charged with receiving and processing images

systemic

Something that is related to the whole body and not just one particular part or organ

uvea

The term used to refer to the part of the eye containing the iris, the cilia, and the choroid.

ophthalmoscope

A type of tool used to look inside the eye

neuritis

A medical condition that results when the nerves become inflamed

glaucoma

A disorder that has resulted from intraocular pressure

idiopathic

Relating to a disease of unknown origin, which may or may not have arisen spontaneously

iris

The colored layer around the pupil

leukemia

An increase in the number of bad white blood cells

blood pressure

The amount of pressure applied by the blood on the arteries.

Courtesy of petmd.com Original Article

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